Napali Capital https://napalicap.com Wed, 17 Oct 2018 17:17:57 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.8 Episode 6: A Forward-Moving Back-Up Plan https://napalicap.com/episode-4-single-family-man-2/ Thu, 04 Oct 2018 20:32:17 +0000 https://napalicap.com/?p=5897 In Episode 6 of Financial Freedom ER, Tim and Tom talk with Dr. Jeff Beers and Dr. Jason Lebwohl, co-founders of JJBL Investing and Hospitality ER, who explain the reasoning that led them to open Hospitality ER and their advice to anyone considering the medical profession. View the podcast

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In Episode 6 of Financial Freedom ER, Tim and Tom talk with Dr. Jeff Beers and Dr. Jason Lebwohl, co-founders of JJBL Investing and Hospitality ER, who explain the reasoning that led them to open Hospitality ER and their advice to anyone considering the medical profession.

View the podcast

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Episode 5: Financial Freedom ER – The Single-Family Man https://napalicap.com/episode-4-single-family-man/ Thu, 06 Sep 2018 20:17:49 +0000 https://napalicap.com/?p=5891 In Episode 5 of Financial Freedom ER, Tom and Tim are joined by Dr. Drew Eldridge who walks us down the path that took him from medical school to purchasing his 30th single family home, and shares lessons and mistakes he learned along the way. View the podcast

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In Episode 5 of Financial Freedom ER, Tom and Tim are joined by Dr. Drew Eldridge who walks us down the path that took him from medical school to purchasing his 30th single family home, and shares lessons and mistakes he learned along the way.

View the podcast

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A Frustrated Physician and Financial Freedom https://napalicap.com/a-frustrated-physician-and-financial-freedom/ https://napalicap.com/a-frustrated-physician-and-financial-freedom/#comments Thu, 16 Aug 2018 20:22:00 +0000 http://passiveincomephysician.com/?p=5689 One question I get a lot: Why did you spend 12 years working toward the goal of becoming a physician only to turn around and begin working to find a way to escape that profession? To understand why, it’s important to understand how I got to the point of wanting to escape. If you’re a […]

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One question I get a lot: Why did you spend 12 years working toward the goal of becoming a physician only to turn around and begin working to find a way to escape that profession? To understand why, it’s important to understand how I got to the point of wanting to escape. If you’re a frustrated physician, you’ll probably relate more than you realize.

By now, you know my story before medical school, so let’s pick up at that point. By the time I left the Navy, I was dead set on becoming a physician.  I lived for the competition and thrived in the studies.  Finishing one class after another was like climbing a ladder of small goals leading up to the ultimate reward of officially becoming a doctor. Then the excitement of deciding on a specialty. It was thrilling, really.

Because of my high class ranking and USMLE scores, the natural assumption was that I’d go into a highly competitive specialty.  So that was the route I started on … Radiology? Nope. Too much dark room and seasonal affect disorder.  Anesthesia? Nah. Not my personality, and in my experience, the surgeons always had an ax to grind with them. Orthopedics? This seemed to best fit my personality, so I gave it a shot. The atmosphere, the almost locker room attitude in the OR felt like home and that military comradery I loved so much.  This was it. I started interviews, letters of recommendation, and applications and finally started getting the calls in the fall of that year.

Life was good. All the years of sacrifice were paying off. My wife and I had just had our first child, and everything was going according to plan. That’s a feeling you don’t forget.  But for me, it was a feeling that quickly faded and faded in the middle of a total hip repair.  At that moment, the realization that I loved the people but hated the process. Did want to do the same thing, day in and day out? It was more mundane than my personality could handle.

If not orthopedics, then what? Emergency medicine was the only thing that even remotely appealed to me at that time, and our program had no emergency medicine program. My legs went numb and I became nauseous. I walked out straight to the counselor hyperventilating.

In end, I did an away rotation, procured the necessary letter, and ultimately matched at an amazing program, which fortunately was my first choice. My wife and I had more children, and I joined a practice in East Texas as part of an extremely busy ER. I enjoyed the challenge and spent learning my craft around some amazing practitioners. THIS was why I’d trained all these long years! Great! Right? Wrong.

Then the trauma and loss that inevitably comes with being in the emergency room began to slowly chip away at my enthusiasm for my profession.  One event, in particular, was the turning point: a child drowning.  Brought in by the EMS crew, she was in asystole and hypothermic after being found in a neighbor’s pool.  We worked for two hours placing tubes, line and vigorously trying to warm and resuscitate.  Never in years past had I let emotion creep in.  Until now, I’d treated the human condition as inanimate objects. But in this case, I saw my daughter in her face.

Looking back this was the first of many cases that changed me. Nights became harder. Doubt crept in. Had I made the right choice? Did it matter?  I was in too deep.  I had an amazing wife and four children and had to provide for them. On the outside, I was well-trained and seemingly confident and aggressive doctor, but on the inside, I was a mess. Something had to change.

I’m going to stop here for a moment to say that you may not recognize these emotions at all. You may be fortunate enough to feel fulfilled in your role as physician, which is a wonderful thing. However, perhaps you recognize yourself or part of yourself in my story. If you do, then you also have experienced the powerful and overwhelming emotions that go with that. You’re not alone. Burnout for our profession is at an all-time high. In fact, our profession has the highest rate of burnout of ANY profession.

Although I didn’t know that at the time, I realize now that my struggle, or at least some part of it, is common. You train for years. You burn out. You keep going because you spent a long time getting here, so now you’re trapped. But here’s the thing: there is a way to escape that feeling.

Back to my story, my wife and I eventually decided that leaving the practice was the best thing for our family, so we moved to be closer to areas of growth where real estate investment opportunities are more readily available. And an amazing thing happened. Pretty soon, our investments were generating enough cash flow and passive income that I could reduce the number of ER shifts on my schedule.

So, to answer why I spent 12 years working toward the goal of becoming a physician only to turn around and begin working to find a way to escape being one … I’m not necessarily trying to escape my profession. I’m trying to escape amount of time I’m obligated to perform in that capacity so that my time can be spent doing other things I enjoy and spending time with my family. I still work as an ER physician but on my own terms. The funny thing is, when you aren’t beholden to something, you tend to enjoy it more.

It is because of the difference cash flow and passive income from real estate investments made and continues to make for me that I’m passionate about it and about sharing what I’ve learned with you and others. If this story resonates with you, or even if it doesn’t, you can enjoy financial freedom, too! I’d love to discuss the possibilities with you!

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Taxes: Pay Less, Keep More https://napalicap.com/taxes-pay-less-keep-more/ Thu, 09 Aug 2018 18:59:23 +0000 http://passiveincomephysician.com/?p=5679 As physicians, we have great earning power—a nice reward for the years of training and sacrifice. Unfortunately, with great income comes a great tax bill. And while, yes, you can write off certain items to reduce your taxable income, a stethoscope and a few pairs of scrubs won’t make much of a dent at the […]

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As physicians, we have great earning power—a nice reward for the years of training and sacrifice. Unfortunately, with great income comes a great tax bill. And while, yes, you can write off certain items to reduce your taxable income, a stethoscope and a few pairs of scrubs won’t make much of a dent at the end of the year. Because of this, we must find a way to reduce the amount of taxes we pay to keep more of the income we earn. Here’s where real estate comes in, providing one of my favorite tax benefits: depreciation.

Behold, the miracle of depreciation

Depreciation is the decline in value of an asset over time. For example, when you buy a new vehicle, it loses value (depreciates) the moment you drive it off the lot. However, while the term depreciation typically has a negative implication, in real estate investing, it is positive, because the government greatly incentivizes business and real estate owners through this concept.

Nearly all items related to the property (toilets, sinks, stoves, fixtures) are depreciable with the exception being the land on which the real estate sits since it is considered a fixed cost. Tax laws provide amazing opportunity by allowing asset owners to deduct the structure’s depreciation, therefore reducing their taxes. This video provides a more detailed explanation and breaks it down with examples:

Plan Now to Save Later

The key to fully benefit from depreciation is in planning. As Mike Pine, CPA, of Pine & Associates CPAs, points out, once the fiscal year is passed, you are stuck with the previous years’ details. You MUST plan for the year or years ahead. By doing this, I’ve managed to greatly offset my income to keep more of what I’ve earned through not only my profession but my real estate investments. So not only am I making more, but I’m also keeping more.

Now, take this a step further. The asset that is providing the opportunity for depreciation also is appreciating over time, thus creating more equity while the value of the building depreciates, thus reducing its tax basis. This, in turn, reduces the amount of taxes paid on the assets that are appreciating in value simultaneously. I’ll take it!

I’ll close by saying that while it is important to understand this concept, it is not something you have to work out on your own. If I’ve said it once, I’ve said is a million times, successful real estate investing is a team sport. Add a trusted tax advisor to your team to help with the details to maximize your profits and net worth.

I’d love to help with questions and hear how depreciation has changed your balance sheet! Let me know!

 

 

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Cash Flow Machine: If You Build It … https://napalicap.com/cash-flow-machine/ Thu, 02 Aug 2018 19:34:53 +0000 http://passiveincomephysician.com/?p=5669 You cannot save your way to retirement. Hopefully, you already know this, but I recently discovered that many people believe they can do it! They think the money you put away each week, month, or year, whether in traditional savings, an IRA or a 401K will accrue enough to get you to your retirement goal. Odds […]

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You cannot save your way to retirement. Hopefully, you already know this, but I recently discovered that many people believe they can do it! They think the money you put away each week, month, or year, whether in traditional savings, an IRA or a 401K will accrue enough to get you to your retirement goal. Odds are it won’t. The gains are small, and the results are inconsistent – and as historically evidenced, can reduce your account balance.  So, what’s the solution? You create a cash flow machine—and invest in that.

Step 1: Create a cash flow machine.

Start small. I find this is the most comfortable approach for those beginning this journey. My first step was to invest in my financial education, whether with time or money and there are many resources for this (this blog being one of them). I then began buying single-family homes to rent. It didn’t take me long to realize the same time and effort could be used to create much larger returns. Enter commercial real estate. I began investing in income-generating multifamily properties and outsourcing the day-to-day operations to onsite management. And the cash was flowing!

Step 2: Invest in your cash flow machine.

So now I had time and money, time I otherwise would have used to manage the property was now used to source new investment opportunities. And the cash flow I was receiving from my investments was used for the second critical step of creating wealth: reinvesting. I funneled it back into the machine to invest in another asset to create more cash flow which was then reinvested in another asset to create more cash flow which was then …  see where I’m going with this?

 

Basically, wealth is like a snowball

Finally, I like to think of retirement as a snowball. Stay with me. Consider money is snow.

You can sit all day and gather it, making small snowballs. At the end of the day, you’ll have a stack of many snowballs that required time and attention to create -OR- You can make a snowball and start rolling it down a hill, watching it gain momentum, growing as it goes with little to no effort on your part. At the end of the day, you’ll have one massive snowball that required only a shove here and there to keep it going and growing. When the temperature rises and the snow stops falling, what will you be left with? Which will take longer to melt? The stack of many small snowballs? Or the one massive snowball? So, wouldn’t you also want to create wealth that takes less effort, builds faster and lasts longer? I know I do!

I tell you my story (and this analogy) to illustrate the possibilities. My hope is you will take this knowledge and apply it in a way that best fits your situation. Start building your cash flow machine now, and let me know how I can help!

 

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Napali Capital Enters North Carolina Market with Purchase of Abbey Court Apartment Homes https://napalicap.com/napali-capital-enters-nc-market-abbey-court-apartment-homes/ Tue, 31 Jul 2018 18:25:32 +0000 https://napalicap.com/?p=1961 Napali Capital, LLC, today announced its most recent acquisition of Abbey Court Apartment Homes in North Carolina. The property is located in the suburb of Belmont, just 12 miles west of Charlotte. The 176-unit complex was acquired as an off-market deal and is Napali Capital’s first property in North Carolina. Abbey Court Apartment Homes is […]

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Napali Capital, LLC, today announced its most recent acquisition of Abbey Court Apartment Homes in North Carolina. The property is located in the suburb of Belmont, just 12 miles west of Charlotte. The 176-unit complex was acquired as an off-market deal and is Napali Capital’s first property in North Carolina.

Abbey Court Apartment Homes is a garden-style community built in 1986 and comprised of 94 one-bedroom units and 82 two-bedroom units. The property offers residents a variety of amenities including swimming pool, playground, grilling and picnic areas, 24-hour emergency maintenance, on-site leasing office, central laundry facility, designated parking, storage units and mature landscaping.

Napali Capital will rebrand the complex and immediately begin implementing the planned $500,000 in property improvements. These include interior renovations and amenity upgrades such as a “bark park,” new pergolas, grilling stations with outdoor seating, and play park. Additional storage units also will be added to meet resident demand. The company will retain Atlanta management company SMP, which manages more than 27,000 doors in the southeast, to manage Abbey Court Apartment Homes.

“We are thrilled to be entering North Carolina with this particular property,” said Napali Capital co-founder and Managing Partner, Thomas Black, M.D. “We’ve had our eye this market for quite some time, and our patience has paid off.”

The closest major city to Abbey Court Apartment Homes, Charlotte, is home to Bank of America headquarters and Wells Fargo’s east coast operations. It recently was announced Amazon will build its new $200 million fulfillment center in Charlotte, which will bring 1,500 additional jobs to the area.

“Abbey Court already is ideally situated between Charlotte and Gastonia, the second largest suburb of the city. The announcement of Amazon’s new fulfillment center only confirmed that we’d made the right choice for our company and our investors,” said Black.

Napali Capital also purchased Westwood Apartments in Dallas earlier this month. Both Abbey Court Apartment Homes and Westwood Apartments are part of the company’s 11-property investment portfolio that creates wealth for physician investors through real estate. The company has properties in Texas, Georgia and North Carolina.

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The Lost Art of Bedside Manner https://napalicap.com/the-lost-art-of-bedside-manner/ Thu, 26 Jul 2018 08:30:10 +0000 http://passiveincomephysician.com/?p=5651 With the evolution of medicine and the overwhelming pressure for physicians to increase their speed, time, and profits, the patient seems to have become an afterthought for those making these changes. In my opinion, the biggest unintentional change has been the decline in our bedside manner. Blame it on the demands, or blame it on […]

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With the evolution of medicine and the overwhelming pressure for physicians to increase their speed, time, and profits, the patient seems to have become an afterthought for those making these changes. In my opinion, the biggest unintentional change has been the decline in our bedside manner. Blame it on the demands, or blame it on burnout, it doesn’t really matter. Patients are feeling it.

Did you know:

  • Bedside manner affects patient health
  • Patients associate bedside manner with a doctor’s skill
  • Bedside manner is a predictor of patient complaints
  • Bedside manner has been shown to be a predictor of malpractice.

All of this considered, we should be paying more attention to this, so here are a few things I try to remind myself of in the Emergency Room.

Technology is not a substitute for personal attention.

Over the last several years, the administrative aspect of our profession has been inundated with technology. Whether the intent was to streamline processes, save time and money, or provide better records, it also has resulted in the decline of a personal patient visit. Not so many years ago, doctors sat with patients, making eye contact, listening and making notes in the chart or maybe even a quick dictation for the patient record. Now, our eye contact has shifted from the patient to the technology at hand, whether an iPad or computer, and the patient feels that. Since we can’t remove technology, remember to intently listen to and focus on the patient.

Communicate simply and honestly.

What is it they say? Communication is key? This is never truer than during a patient visit. Patients are there as much to learn as they are to be treated. Take the time to explain the procedures and diagnosis and the treatment in terms that they can understand. Sure, if you want to tell a patient their recurring headaches are a result of Sphenopalatine ganglioneuralgia then, by all means, go ahead. Just make sure to follow it up by explaining that is a fancy term for brain freeze.

And of course, it goes without saying: when delivering the diagnosis and all the accompanying information, be sure to, in fact, relay all the accompanying information. If you don’t tell them, Google will.

Remember that this particular exam/event/visit is the most important thing to your patient.

Remember when you started medical school? The magnitude of the responsibility for your patients? The intense focus you had when analyzing symptoms? The pride you felt in discovering that elusive diagnosis? Or removing the stitches you so carefully placed so as not to leave a glaring scar? The care you took in following up and making sure that your patient was being treated with the attention they deserved?

Now, fast forward to present day. It’s 10 a.m., and you just diagnosed your fifth case of strep today, and there is a waiting room full of patients waiting to see if they’ll be the next lucky winner of that diagnosis. In fact, you can probably narrow down the likely additional cases with a quick glimpse across the room. In that moment, do you still feel that same sense of awe that you felt in those years? Probably not. But it’s not because you don’t care. It’s because this is your work, what you do day in and day out, and the reality is that what once was a new and exciting experience is now just your average day. (I imagine it is this way for many professions, just with different circumstances.) It’s important to remember while these scenarios have become an average day for us, it is not an average day for the patient. This exam/event/visit is their primary focus and for many, may be a life-changing moment. When you think about it this way, it’s easy to adjust your perspective.

Overall, bedside manner is a skill that immensely affects the patient experience, and consequently, our experience. Mostly, though, it’s just the decent way to practice. We should make sure we hone this skill in the same way we hone all other professional skills to make sure we deliver what our patients need.

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Multifamily: The Gift That Keeps On Giving https://napalicap.com/multifamily-the-gift-that-keeps-on-giving/ Fri, 20 Jul 2018 15:30:19 +0000 http://passiveincomephysician.com/?p=5645 Two weeks ago, I shared why multifamily was my real estate investment vehicle of choice. Last week, following discussions with readers and colleagues, I aimed to quell fears about the actual process of investing in this type of real estate. Since then, I’ve continued to receive feedback and questions that made me stop to think about how […]

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Two weeks ago, I shared why multifamily was my real estate investment vehicle of choice. Last week, following discussions with readers and colleagues, I aimed to quell fears about the actual process of investing in this type of real estate. Since then, I’ve continued to receive feedback and questions that made me stop to think about how others who have never invested in multifamily are feeling. You see, I’ve already adjusted my thinking. I’ve already gone through this process several times and am already experiencing first-hand the benefits that come from this type of investment. I’m sold (pun intended).

Change your mind!

However, many people I’ve spoken with have not gone through this process—yet. Their thinking is still solely focused on the path for which they have trained. It can be difficult to change a generations-old ideology programmed by family, profession, and personal history. We study, train, and practice diligently – for years. By God, we’d better put our noses to the grindstone and make use of that effort! This was me at the beginning of my career, and I’m guessing this is probably you to a large degree. So, if my previous blogs on why and how multifamily can change your life and change your mindset didn’t do the trick, I’ll list a few more.

Multifamily is here to stay.

  • Housing prices are increasing, and home affordability is decreasing. This leads to an increase in renters.
  • Single-family inventory/construction is down, particularly in urban and suburban areas, but the population is increasing. This leads to an increase in renters.
  • Hiring rates are slower, decreasing the number of upwardly mobile professionals and those able to afford single-family housing. This leads to an increase in renters.
  • People, millennials in particular, are CHOOSING not to own homes to avoid the hassles and cost of home ownership. This leads to an increase in renters.

Notice a common thread among these? As single-family availability, affordability, and desirability decrease, the number of renters, and therefore the need for multifamily properties, increases. Those who invest in it will reap the immediate rewards of cashflow and passive income. In my opinion, it’s a much better projection than that of a standard investment portfolio.

One more point.

This is not necessarily something that should be in done in place of your hard-earned career. Instead, think of it as something to be done in addition to your hard-earned career. That being said, if done right, multifamily investing eventually could allow you to replace your professional income if you choose. And that’s really what it boils down to for me: choice. Creating the income to increase my wealth gives me a choice in my professional and personal life. Choose now so you can choose later!

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Napali Capital Acquires Westwood Apartments in Dallas https://napalicap.com/napali-capital-acquires-westwood-apartments-in-dallas/ Thu, 19 Jul 2018 19:34:28 +0000 https://napalicap.com/?p=1922 NAPALI CAPITAL ACQUIRES WESTWOOD APARTMENTS IN DALLAS Newest property located in rapidly growing submarket of city Napali Capital, LLC, today announced the acquisition of Westwood Apartments in Dallas. The 187-unit property is located southwest of the city and just minutes from downtown. This acquisition brings the company’s current portfolio total to eight properties, with three […]

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NAPALI CAPITAL ACQUIRES WESTWOOD APARTMENTS IN DALLAS
Newest property located in rapidly growing submarket of city

Napali Capital, LLC, today announced the acquisition of Westwood Apartments in Dallas. The 187-unit property is located southwest of the city and just minutes from downtown. This acquisition brings the company’s current portfolio total to eight properties, with three of these located in the DFW metroplex.

Westwood Apartments was built in 1969 and consists of 187 one-, two-, and three-bedroom units divided among 15 buildings. It is situated adjacent to Briar Gate Park and is near schools, Fiesta Supermarket, and many other retail and dining establishments. The popular Bishops Arts District is also just five miles away, offering residents additional dining and entertainment options.

Napali Capital plans to immediately rebrand Westwood Apartments and invest more than $400,000 for property upgrades and amenity improvements over the next 12 months. The company will retain Place 10 Residential to continue daily onsite management.

“DFW continues to present a wealth of opportunity for our company and investors,” said Napali Capital co-founder and Managing Partner, Thomas Black, M.D. “This area, in particular, is positioned for impressive growth over the next several years, and we are excited to be part of it.”

The area surrounding Westwood Apartments is poised for massive growth. Dallas’ GrowSouth Strategy aims to jumpstart local growth of that will to continue throughout the next several years through added infrastructure and capital improvements to bring businesses, additional public transportation and an increased demand for housing the area. Directly south of the apartments is the RedBird area which also is experiencing a revitalization through redevelopment.

This purchase aligns with Napali Capital’s strategy to acquire properties in areas with a strong economic base, low unemployment and job growth. In addition to Texas, Napali Capital currently owns properties in Georgia and plans to enter the Charlotte, North Carolina, market later this month.

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Comparing Size in Real Estate https://napalicap.com/comparing-size-in-real-estate/ Thu, 12 Jul 2018 20:13:13 +0000 http://passiveincomephysician.com/?p=5609 After last week’s blog about why I prefer multifamily real estate as my investment vehicle,  I received a number of questions. Most of those questions related to the idea that investing in multifamily was financially intimidating. Sure, the size of the property, the size of the loan, and the size of the initial capital involved can […]

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After last week’s blog about why I prefer multifamily real estate as my investment vehicle,  I received a number of questions. Most of those questions related to the idea that investing in multifamily was financially intimidating. Sure, the size of the property, the size of the loan, and the size of the initial capital involved can be unnecessarily overwhelming, So, let’s dispel some of those thoughts!

Ease of Financing

Don’t let size fool you; multifamily properties often are easier to finance than single-family homes. Yes, multifamily properties carry a larger price tag than single-family housing, but for good reason: they are unequivocally bigger іn just about every way. According to Zillow, one of the country’s most popular home valuation sites, “the median home value іn the United States is $200,700,” and that price point is up 6.8 percent from the previous year. Despite this spike in housing prices we have seen in recent years, the value of single-family homes pale іn comparison to those of multifamily properties.

Interestingly enough though, the higher price of multifamily property doesn’t condemn them to impossible lending practices. In fact, multifamily properties actually are more likely to be approved by a bank for a loan than the average home. Why? Because they are much more likely to generate cash flow each and every month, allowing for a better guarantee of payment.

 

Scalability of Investment

On this same topic of size, many people think of multifamily as large 100+ unit complexes and immediately dismiss the idea of it being a feasible investment. Don’t let this misinformation dissuade you. Multifamily comes in a variety of sizes and classes, giving you options for your investment. Scale your investment to meet your capability. Start with a smaller, Class B or C complex that better suits your available capital.

If money is really tight, take it one step further: live in one of the unites and pay down the mortgage you receive from rent. Not only is it entirely possible tо pay your own mortgage with the rents you collect, but you quickly will find yourself ready to purchase a second property. You’ll have a portfolio in a relatively short period of time.

 

Speed of Accumulation

This leads us to the rate of accumulation. It stands to reason that the average real estate portfolio isn’t created overnight. In fact, today’s most prolific real estate portfolios are the direct result of years and years of hard work. However, just because a great real estate portfolios takes time, doesn’t mean it needs to take forever. And therein lies on of the best benefits of multifamily real estate: itcan facilitate the growth of a sizable portfolio in both a timely and profitable fashion.

For example, acquiring a four-unit building requires an investor to complete only one transaction that wіll result in four streams of income. On the flip side, a single-family home investor would need to complete four independent deals in order to add the same amount of income streams. The latter option also would have the investor close four escrows, hire four inspectors, apply for four different loans, pay four different closing costs—you get the point. Buying a multifamily property wіll save you the headache of closing on multiple deals at a time and, perhaps even more importantly, save you a great deal of time in the process. The bonus? Multifamily housing typically is acquired with existing tenants and therefore, immediate cash flow. The same cannot be said for single housing in most cases.

I want to make it abundantly clear: multifamily real estate is not the only strategy that will help you accrue wealth. It is worth noting, however, that it potentially can be the only one you need. If you are looking to achieve financial freedom, or at the very least rid yourself of paycheck dependency, you could do far worse than investing in multifamily real estate. In my experience, it is not only a great first step on this road to financial freedom, but also a viable investment strategy for the duration of your career.

Have more questions? I’d love to hear them!

 

 

 

 

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